ITS @ CUNY

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Towards the physics of more complex behaviors
Oct
11
9:30 AM09:30

Towards the physics of more complex behaviors

  • The Science Center (Rm. 4102) at The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Friday, October 11, 2019

9:30am-6:00pm
The Science Center (Rm. 4102) at The Graduate Center, CUNY

In the past decade there has been considerable progress toward a “physics of behavior,” taming the complexity of animal movements in their natural contexts. Here we explore the next layers of complexity in songbirds, dolphins, and the general problem of animal navigation.

9:30 AM Bagels & Coffee

10:00 AM Animal Navigation in Uncertain Environments
Agnese Seminara, Institut de Physique de Nice

11:30 AM Coffee Break

12:00 PM Quantitative windows into the minds of dolphins
Marcelo Magnasco, Rockefeller University

1:30 PM Lunch

2:30 PM How birds sing: taking precise data, making precise theories, Part I
Ilya Nemenman & Samuel Sober, Emory University

4:00 PM Coffee Break

4:30 PM How birds sing, Part II
Ilya Nemenman & Samuel Sober, Emory University

Register here.
Download Event PDF here.
Download Full Series PDF here.

Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Physics and Biology. Supported in part by the Center for the Physics of Biological Function, a joint effort of The Graduate Center and Princeton University. For more information please visit https://itsatcuny.org and https://biophysics.princeton.edu.

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Recent Advances in Electron and Proton Transfer Theories
Oct
25
9:30 AM09:30

Recent Advances in Electron and Proton Transfer Theories

  • The Skylight Room (Rm. 9100) at The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Friday, October 25, 2019

9:30am-6:30pm
The Skylight Room (Rm. 9100) at The Graduate Center, CUNY

Electron and proton transfers are among the simplest possible chemical reactions. We explore recent progress on the theory of these reactions, especially the subtle interplay of classical and quantum dynamics, as well as implications for fundamental processes in biological systems.

With:

Proton-coupled electron transfer in catalysis and energy conversion
Sharon Hammes-Schiffer, Yale University

Quantum dynamics simulations of proton-coupled electron transfer reactions
Pengfei (Frank) Huo, University of Rochester

Electron transfer in respiratory complex one
Alexei Stuchebrukhov, University of California at Davis

Protein electron transfer: Nonergodic sampling, FDT violation, and solvent dynamical effects
Dmitry Matyushov, Arizona State University

Electron transfer signaling and multielectron brokering in biology
David Beratan, Duke University

Full Day Schedule TBD.
Register here.
Download Full Series PDF here.
Organized by Seogjoo Jang, Seogjoo.Jang@qc.cuny.edu.

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Recent Advances in Nonlinear Problems
Oct
31
9:30 AM09:30

Recent Advances in Nonlinear Problems

  • The Science Center (Rm. 4102) at The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Thursday, October 31, 2019

9:30am-4:00pm
The Science Center (Rm. 4102) at The Graduate Center, CUNY

Nonlinear PDE is an important mathematical area that impacts many different fields in mathematics and physics. This one-day event, which is now part of a symposium series at the Graduate Center, CUNY, aims to explore recent trends, applications, and future directions in this very active area.

9:00 AM Coffee

9:30 AM Immersed 2-spheres in ℝ3 from a Morse theoretic perspective
Tristan Rivière, ETH Zürich (Switzerland)

10:30 AM Coffee

10:45 AM Boundary operator associated to 𝜎𝑘 curvature
Yi Wang, Johns Hopkins University (USA)

11:45 AM Lunch

1:30 PM Topological & variational methods for the supercritical Moser-Trudinger equation
Luca Martinazzi, University of Padua (Italy)

2:30 PM Coffee

3:00 PM Symmetries and concentration in variational problems
Mónica Clapp, Universidad Nacional Autónoma (México)

Register here.
Download printable event pdf here.
Download event packet with full speaker abstracts here.
Download Full Series PDF here.

Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY Graduate Center departments of Math and Physics, as well as College of Staten Island. Organized by Marcello Lucia (marcello.lucia@csi.cuny.edu) and Zeno Huang (zheng.huang@csi.cuny.edu).
For more information, visit https://itsatcuny.org or http://www.math.csi.cuny.edu/ciamcs.

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Searching for simpler models
Nov
15
9:30 AM09:30

Searching for simpler models

  • The Skylight Room (Rm. 9100) at The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Friday, November 15, 2019

9:30am-6:00pm
The Skylight Room (Rm. 9100) at The Graduate Center, CUNY

There has been remarkable progress in turning our qualitative preference for simple models of the natural world into quantitative, mathematical principles. We explore these developments, both as general principles and in examples from biological systems and deep neural networks.

Speakers & Full Day Schedule TBD.
Register here.
Download full series pdf here.

Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Physics and Biology. Supported in part by the Center for the Physics of Biological Function, a joint effort of The Graduate Center and Princeton University. For more information please visit https://itsatcuny.org and https://biophysics.princeton.edu.

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Conformal Bootstrap and Related Ideas
Nov
22
9:30 AM09:30

Conformal Bootstrap and Related Ideas

  • Elebash Recital Hall at The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Friday, November 22, 2019

9:30am-6:00pm
Elebash Recital Hall at The Graduate Center, CUNY

The bootstrap program aims to map the space of possible quantum field theories, constrained only by symmetries and the basic principles of quantum mechanics. We explore exciting new developments, including non-perturbative results, field theories at finite temperature, and more.

Speakers & Full Day Schedule TBD.
Register here.
Download Full Series PDF here.
Organized by Sebastian Franco, sfranco@ccny.cuny.edu.

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Adaptation
Dec
6
9:30 AM09:30

Adaptation

  • The Martin E. Segal Theatre (1st Floor) at The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Friday, December 6, 2019

9:30am-6:00pm
The Martin E. Segal Theatre (1st Floor) at The Graduate Center, CUNY

Living systems achieve their extraordinary functions in part by adapting their strategies to the structure of their environment. We explore examples of this phenomenon in systems from bacteria to brains, searching for a unifying theoretical framework.

  9:30 AM Coffee and bagels

10:00 AM Adaptation and Bayesian forecasting in biological systems
Thierry Mora, École Normale Supérieure and Princeton University

11:30 AM Coffee

12:00 PM Neural adaptation: Theory, models, and mechanism
Adrienne Fairhall, University of Washington

1:30 PM Lunch

2:30 PM Adaptation and behavioral feedback in chemical sensing and navigation
Thierry Emonet, Yale University

4:00 PM Coffee

4:30 PM Adaptation and control in molecular evolution
Armita Nourmohammad, University of Washington

Register here.
Download printable event pdf here.
Download full series pdf here.

Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Physics and Biology. Supported in part by the Center for the Physics of Biological Function, a joint effort of The Graduate Center and Princeton University. For more information please visit https://itsatcuny.org and https://biophysics.princeton.edu.

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Many Body Quantum Dynamics: Perspectives From Field Theory and Gravity
May
9
9:00 AM09:00

Many Body Quantum Dynamics: Perspectives From Field Theory and Gravity

  • Elebash Hall (1st Floor), The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

In recent years, there has been significant progress in the problem of interacting many-body quantum systems. The advances have drawn insights from and revealed profound connections between a broad range of fronts, including quantum field theory, black holes, quantum chaos, AMO, condensed matter physics and quantum information. A salient example of such interconnectedness is the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev (SYK), which is a model for strange metals, describes quantum gravity near black holes and constitutes a new class of large N QFT, sitting midway in complexity between vector and matrix models. This workshop will be devoted to the most exciting new developments in this field. Topics to be covered include:

• New exactly solvable quantum field theories
• Black holes
• Non-equilibrium systems
• Transport and quantum chaos
• Connections to condensed matter physics

9:30 AM Coffee and bagels

10:00 AM Regenesis, Quantum Chaos, and Hydrodynamics
Hong Liu, MIT

11:30 AM Coffee

12:00 PM Black Holes, Random Matrices, Baby Universes, and D-brane
Steve Shenker, Stanford

1:30 PM Lunch

2:30 PM Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking in Coupled SYK or Tensor Models
Igor Klebanov, Princeton

4:00 PM Coffee

4:30 PM Strange Metal Transport and Chaos from SYK Models
Subir Sachdev, Harvard

Register here.
Download event PDF here.


Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences & the CUNY doctoral program in Physics. Organized by Sebastian Franco (CCNY and The Graduate Center, CUNY), Vijay Balasubramanian (Princeton, U Penn, and The Graduate Center, CUNY), and Daniel Kabat (Lehman College and The Graduate Center CUNY)

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Dynamics & information in transcriptional control
May
3
9:30 AM09:30

Dynamics & information in transcriptional control

  • The Graduate Center, CUNY (The Sklyight Room, Rm 9100) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS


All cells must control the way in which they read out the information encoded in their genes, and this control must make sense in relation to their environment. Much of this control happens at the step where DNA is transcribed into messenger RNA. In this symposium we explore recent progress in transcriptional control: new experiments that give us an unprecedented view of molecular events during transcription, new theoretical ideas about the way in which large numbers of molecules can cooperate to achieve more effective control, and new results on the idea that real biological control networks maybe be selected to reach the physical limits on their performance as information processing devices.

9:30 AM Coffee and bagels

10:00 AM Transcription factors, chromosome topology, and transcription control
Jie Xiao, Johns Hopkins University

11:30 AM Coffee

12:00 PM Phase separation and regulation of gene transcription in eukaryotes
Arup Chakraborty, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

1:30 PM Lunch

2:30 PM DNA polymer physics and transcription dynamics in the developing fly embryo
Thomas Gregor, Princeton University and Institut Pasteur

4:00 PM Coffee

4:30 PM Deriving the Drosophila gap gene network from optimization principles
Thomas Sokolowski, IST Austria

All are welcome, but please follow the links to register.

Download Event PDF here.
Download Full Series PDF here.
Register here.


Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Physics and Biology. Supported in part by the Center for the Physics of Biological Function, a joint effort of The Graduate Center and Princeton University. For more information see https://biophysics.princeton.edu.

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The problem of ecological diversity
Apr
12
9:30 AM09:30

The problem of ecological diversity

  • The Graduate Center, CUNY (The Science Center, Rm 4102) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

A dramatic fact about life on earth is its diversity of form and function. This has become even more clear as modern sequencing tools allow us to survey large populations of microbes, in environments ranging from the human gut to the open ocean. Classical ecological models, however, predict rather limited levels of species diversity. In this symposium we will explore recent experimental developments, as well as new theoretical approaches, grounded in statistical physics. We will see glimpses of the solution to the qualitative problem of diversity, but also outlines of theories that can make more quantitative connections to experiment.

10:00 AM Coffee and bagels

10:30 AM A bottom-up approach to microbial community assembly
Jeff Gore, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

12:00 PM Lunch

1:30 PM The origin of chaos in large interacting ecosystems
Giulio Biroli, École Normale Supérieure

3:00 PM Coffee

3:30 PM Microbial diversity and spatio-temporal chaos
Daniel Fisher, Stanford University

Discussions will continue informally in Room 5301, into the evening. A light buffet dinner will be served.

Download Event PDF here.
Download Full Series PDF here.
Register here.

Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Physics and Biology. Supported in part by the Center for the Physics of Biological Function, a joint effort of The Graduate Center and Princeton University. For more information please visit https://itsatcuny.org  and https://biophysics.princeton.edu.

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Balance and Conflict
Apr
5
9:00 AM09:00

Balance and Conflict

  • The Graduate Center, CUNY (C201/202 - lower level) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Network dynamics in society, culture, and politics: Balance and Conflict

Network properties exist at many different levels: molecular reactions in biological systems, the creation of new ideas through social interactions, the diffusion of information through social media, and the factors that interact to create peace or violence.  This session will explore both the similarities and differences in the structure and function of those networks at different levels: from molecules through social media, to peace. This is the final event in a series of three symposia this semester.

Friday 5 April 2019

9:30 AM Coffee & Bagels

10:00 AM Network-based Dynamic Modeling of Biological Systems: Toward Understanding and Control 
Reka Albert, Pennsylvania State University

11:30 AM Where do new ideas come from, and what do we do when we get them?
Simon DeDeo, Carnegie Mellon University 

1:00 PM Lunch

2:00 PM Tribal Networks and Diffusion of News on Social Media
Soroush Vosoughi, MIT

3:30 PM Coffee

4:00 PM Factors in Sustainable Peace: Dynamical Models and Data Science
Larry Liebovitch, Queens College and The Graduate Center, CUNY

Register here.
Download the event PDF here.

Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Physics and Biology. For more information please visit https://itsatcuny.org

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Mar
28
to Mar 29

Frontiers of Theoretical Physics II

  • The Science Center at The Graduate Center, CUNY (Rm 4102) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

An  extraordinary  feature  of  modern  theoretical  physics  is  its  interconnectedness.  As  we look  more  deeply  at  particular  problems,  we  find  unexpected  links  to  seemingly  very different  problems.  Ideas  and  methods  from  one  subfield  become  crucial  to  progress  ion other  subfields,  and  looking  at  new  phenomena  poses  conceptual  challenges  far beyond  the  original  context.  In  this  series  of  symposia  we  celebrate  this  unity  of  our subject,  bringing  together  leading  young  researchers  exploring  a  wide  range  of  topics. In  the  first  day’s  events,  we  will  hear  about  problems  ranging  from  the  physics  of biological  systems  to  quantum  gravity,  and  from  quantum  field  theory  to  the  interface between  physics  and  computation.

Thursday 28 March 2019

1:00 PM  Fundamental  Constraints  for  Fundamental  Theories
Rachel  Rosen,  Columbia  University

2:00 PM  Coffee

2:30 PM  Entropy  and  superspace
Amos  Yarom, Technion

Friday 29 March 2019

9:30 AM Coffee and bagels

10:00 AM  Many  facets  of  conformal  field  theories
Anatoly  Dymarsky,  University  of  Kentucky

11:00 AM  Coffee

11:30 AM  The  Surprising  Simplicity  of  Scattering  Amplitudes
Jacob  Bourjaily,  Niels  Bohr  Institute

12:30 PM Lunch

1:30 PM  Why  does AI  seem  hard  and  Physics  seem  simple?
Dan  Roberts,  Facebook  AI  Research

2:30 PM Coffee

3:00 PM  Shining  light  on  quantum  geometry  and  fractionalisation
Inti  Sodemann,  Max  Planck  Institute  for  the  Physics  of  Complex  Systems

Download event pdf here.

For more information please contact its@gc.cuny.edu or visit https://itsatcuny.org

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Computational Modeling for High Energy Density Science and Complex Systems
Mar
15
2:00 PM14:00

Computational Modeling for High Energy Density Science and Complex Systems

High Energy Density Science is the study of matter under extreme pressures and temperatures that is too dense to be described by usual plasma physics but is too hot to be described by usual condensed matter physics. This is realized in a range of situations, from the cores of planets, to inertial confinement fusion capsules, to ultra-fast laser pulses impinging on a solid. Efficient and accurate quantum treatments of correlated electron dynamics as well as ion dynamics of large systems are required. Experts will discuss recent developments and challenges in the computational simulation of such complex systems.

2-3pm Electronic transport properties of warm dense matter from time-dependent density functional theory
Attila Cangi, Sandia National Labs

3:15-4:15pm Time-dependent density functional theory of molecules in liquids and at surfaces: many-body effects, broadening and enhancements
Michele Pavanello, Rutgers University at Newark

4:30-5:30pm The interplay of temperature and interaction strength in density functional theory
Aurora Pribram-Jones, University of California, Merced

Sponsore by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Chemistry and Physics. Please email nmaitra@hunter.cuny.edu with any questions.

Register here.
Download pdf event flier here.

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Collective phenomena: Neurons, networks, and language
Mar
15
9:30 AM09:30

Collective phenomena: Neurons, networks, and language

  • The Graduate Center, CUNY (The Skylight Room, Rm. 9100) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Life is more than the sum of its parts. In the brain, our thoughts and actions surely require coordination among large numbers of neurons. Such emergent, collective phenomena are the subject of a deep theoretical literature, much of it grounded in statistical physics, but the subject has been re-invigorated by the possibility of recording, simultaneously, the activity of hundreds or even thousands of individual neurons. In this symposium, we begin with an overview of these experimental developments, then explore different approaches to the theory of large neuronal networks, and finally ask if we can find a statistical physics description of what might be the brain’s most remarkable behavior—human language.

9:30 AM Coffee and bagels

10:00 AM Measuring and understanding the brain’s model of the external world
Loren Frank, University of California at San Francisco and HHMI

11:30 AM Coffee

12:00 PM The intrinsic neuronal dynamics of a canonical cognitive circuit
Ila Fiete, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

1:30 PM Lunch

2:30 PM Between chaos and functionality in the dynamics of large networks
Fred Wolf, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization

4:00 PM Coffee

4:30 PM The landscape of language: Insights from statistical mechanics
Eric DeGiuli, École Normale Supérieure

Register here.
Download event PDF here.
Download Full Series PDF here.

Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Physics and Biology. Supported in part by the Center for the Physics of Biological Function, a joint effort of The Graduate Center and Princeton University. For more information see https://biophysics.princeton.edu.

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Engagement  & Estrangement
Mar
1
9:00 AM09:00

Engagement & Estrangement

  • The Science Center at The Graduate Center, CUNY (Rm 4102) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Network dynamics in society, culture, and politics: Engagement and Estrangement

This symposium, the second in a series of three this semester, focuses on the evolution of collective intelligence and cooperation in human society. We will examine how behavior spreads in social networks, how network stability can be maintained, and about how cooperation may evolve.
Friday 1 March 2019

9:30am: Coffee & Bagels

10am: How behavior spreads
Damon Centola, University of Pennsylvania

11:30am: Network influencers: Understanding information flow and stability in networks
Hernan Makse, CCNY and The Graduate Center, CUNY

1pm: Lunch

2pm: The evolution of cooperation in social systems
David Melamed, Ohio State University

3:30pm: Coffee

4pm: Crowd wisdom enhanced by costly signaling in a virtual rating system
Ofer Tchernichovski, Hunter College and The Graduate Center, CUNY

Register here.
Download the event PDF here.

Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Physics and Biology. For more information please visit https://itsatcuny.org

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Network dynamics in society, culture, and politics: Crowds and cooperation
Feb
1
9:30 AM09:30

Network dynamics in society, culture, and politics: Crowds and cooperation

  • The Science Center (Rm 4120) at the CUNY Graduate Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This symposium, the first in a series of three this semester, explores the convergence among data sciences, network dynamics, and social sciences in studying the evolution of cooperation and segregation. We discuss both basic science and practical challenges, including real-world empirical studies, across a wide range of examples.

9:30 AM Coffee and bagels

10:00 AM Data science at The New York Times
Chris Wiggins, Columbia University and The New York Times

11:30 AM Coffee

12:00 PM Fashion dynamics: Cycles, shocks, and politics
Stefano Ghirlanda, Brooklyn College & The Graduate Center; Stockholm University

1:30 PM Lunch

2:30 PM Agency and structure in the genesis of network segregation
Kevin Lewis, University of California at San Diego

4:00 PM Coffee

4:30 PM Cooperation in complex societies: How do inter-ethnic relationships affect pro-social behavior?
Delia Baldassarri, New York University

Register here.
Download the event PDF here.

Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Physics and Biology. 

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Dec
14
9:30 AM09:30

Exploring sequence space

  • The Science Center (Rm 4102), The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

F Dec 14 9:30am-6:15pm in the Science Center (Rm 4102)
Events begin at 9:30 AM with coffee and bagels, and conclude a bit after 6 PM. Lunch will be served.
Register here: https://goo.gl/forms/WOaSDEb0aOcX7MFK2.

Sequence diversity in the adaptive immune system
Curtis Callan, Princeton University

Deep learning and proteins
Lucy Colwell, Cambridge University

Learning protein constitutive motifs from sequence data
Remi Monasson, École Normale Supérieure

The evolutionary “design” of proteins
Rama Ranganathan, The University of Chicago

Full series PDF here.

Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Physics and Biology. Supported in part by the Center for the Physics of Biological Function, a joint effort of The Graduate Center and Princeton University. For more information see https://biophysics.princeton.edu.

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Nov
16
9:30 AM09:30

Seeing beyond V1

  • Skylight Room (Rm 9100), The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

F Nov 16 9:30am-6:15pm in the Skylight Room (Rm 9100)
Events begin at 9:30 AM with coffee and bagels, and conclude a bit after 6 PM. Lunch will be served.
Register here: https://goo.gl/forms/NMpuJjxwY81g8ETE2

Neural mechanisms for seeing without V1
Tony Ro, The Graduate Center, CUNY

How the brain signals memories of what we’ve seen
Nicole Rust, University of Pennsylvania

How high-order image statistics shape cortical visual processing
Jonathan Victor, Weill Cornell School of Medicine

Using goal-driven deep neural networks to understand the visual pathway
Daniel Yamins, Stanford University

Full series PDF here.

Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Physics and Biology. Supported in part by the Center for the Physics of Biological Function, a joint effort of The Graduate Center and Princeton University. For more information see https://biophysics.princeton.edu.

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Oct
26
9:00 AM09:00

Entanglement, Chaos, and Complexity in Field Theory and Gravity

  • Elebash Hall, The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

F Oct 26 9am-6pm in Elebash Hall

Recent years have seen an explosion of interest in the role of quantum information in physical theories. Tools from quantum information such as complexity and entanglement are being used to understand and even formulate the behavior of quantum field theories and quantum gravity. Conversely these physical theories provide new settings where concepts from quantum information can be calculated and understood. This workshop will be devoted to recent developments in this area. Topics to be covered include:

Entanglement entropy in quantum field theory
Holography and entanglement entropy
Toy models of holography
Quantum chaos
Complexity

Friday 26 October 2018
9:30 AM Coffee and bagels

10:00 AM Title TBA
Robert Myers, Perimeter Institute

11:30 AM Coffee


12:00 PM dS/dS, T-Tbar and EE
Eva Silverstein, Stanford University

1:30 PM Lunch

3:00 PM Open Strings at the Rindler Horizon
Edward Witten, Institute for Advanced Study

4:30 PM Coffee

5:00 PM Universal scrambling dynamics and quantum gravity
Brian Swingle, University of Maryland

Download event pdf here.

Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral program in Physics. Organized by Vijay Balasubramanian, Sebastian Franco (CCNY),
and Daniel Kabat (Lehman College)

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Oct
12
9:30 AM09:30

Evolutionary dynamics and influenza

  • The Science Center (Rm 4102), The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

F Oct 12 9:30am-6:15pm in the Science Center (Rm 4102)
Register
here. Download full schedule here.

9:30am Coffee & Bagels

10:30am What the 1918 flu taught us about adaptation to self
Benjamin Greenbaum,  Mount Sinai School of Medicine

11:30am Coffee

12:00pm Minimal fitness models for evolutionary predictions
Marta Łuksza, Mount Sinai School of Medicine

1:30pm Lunch

2:30pm Universality in rapidly adapting populations
Richard Neher, University of Basel

4:00pm Coffee

4:30pm Learning influenza infection dynamics from genetic data
Daniel Weissman, Emory University

Full series PDF here.

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Sep
21
9:00 AM09:00

Machine learning in the molecular sciences

  • The Science Center (Rm 4102), The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

F Sept. 21 9am-6pm in the Science Center (Rm 4102)
Register
here.

Machine learning (ML) and data-driven computational approaches have recently emerged as promising new tools to tackle complex optimization and computational problems. This workshop offers exciting new developments in applying such approaches to address challenging theoretical and computational issues in molecular sciences. Experts in quantum calculations, dynamics, molecular reactions, and materials design will share unique ideas and challenges.

Download PDF full schedule here.

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