ITS @ CUNY

Calendar


May
16
4:15 PM16:15

Three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics system forced by space-time white noise 

  • Room 6496 at The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Kazuo Yamazaki, University of Rochester 

Abstract: The magnetohydrodynamics system consists of the Navier-Stokes equations forced by Lorentz force, coupled with the Maxwell's equations from electromagnetism. This talk will be relatively expository about the direction of research on stochastic PDE forced by space-time white noise, with a new result on the three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics system forced by space-time white noise. In short, the fact that the noise is white in not only time but also space forces the solution to become extremely rough in spatial variable, its regularity akin to those of distributions, so that it becomes difficult for the non-linear term to become well-defined in any classical sense because there is no universal agreement on a product of a distribution with another distribution. Our discussion should also include following systems of equations: Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation, Boussinesq system. The following notions and techniques may also be included in our discussions: Feynman diagrams, local subcriticality, paracontrolled distributions, renormalizations, regularity structures, rough path theory, Wick products, Young's integral. 

Part of the Non-Linear Study Group. For more info, see https://www.math.csi.cuny.edu/~mlucia/GCactivities.html

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Quantum Dynamics and Control beyond Simple Models and Approximations
May
10
9:00 AM09:00

Quantum Dynamics and Control beyond Simple Models and Approximations

  • The Science Center at The Graduate Center, CUNY (Room 4102) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

From fundamental conceptual issues to the development of novel quantum devices, accurate calculation and control of quantum dynamical systems have great implications. However, beyond simple models and approximations, such tasks in general involve notoriously difficult theoretical problems. This workshop brings together experts working on these topics from both fields of condensed matter physics and chemical physics. The workshop will offer multifaceted information on current advances of quantum dynamics and control, and also will help understand core theoretical issues.

9:00 - 9:30 AM Bagels and Coffee

9:30 - 10:40 AM From defect creation to order parameter steering: Dynamical phase transitions in condensed matter systems
Andrew Millis, Columbia University and the Flatiron Institute

11:00 - 12:10 PM The multilayer multi-configuration time dependent Hartree theory
Haobin Wang, University of Colorado Denver

12:10 - 1:30 PM Lunch

1:30 - 2:40 PM Accurate and efficient non-adiabatic quantum dynamics using master equations
Tom Markland, Stanford University

3:00 - 4:10 PM Manifestations of chaos in many-body quantum dynamics
Lea Santos, Yeshiva University

4:30 - 5:40 PM Controlling quantum dynamics phenomena with shaped fields acting as photonic reagents
Herschel A Rabitz, Princeton University

Register here.
Download printable PDF schedule here.


Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Chemistry and Physics. Organized by Dr. Seogjoo Jang. Please email sjang@qc.cuny.edu with any questions

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May
9
4:15 PM16:15

A spiral interface with positive Alt-Caffarelli-Friedman limit at the origin 

  • Room 6496 at The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Dennis Kriventsov, Rutgers University 

Abstract: I will discuss an example of a pair of continuous nonnegative subharmonic functions, each vanishing where the other is positive, which have a strictly positive limit for the Alt-Caffarelli-Friedman monotonicity formula at the origin, but for which the origin is not a point of differentiability for the boundary of their supports. Time permitting, I will also discuss some further progress on related problems.This is based on joint work with Mark Allen. 

Part of the Non-Linear Study Group. For more info, see https://www.math.csi.cuny.edu/~mlucia/GCactivities.html

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Many Body Quantum Dynamics: Perspectives From Field Theory and Gravity
May
9
9:00 AM09:00

Many Body Quantum Dynamics: Perspectives From Field Theory and Gravity

  • Elebash Hall (1st Floor), The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

In recent years, there has been significant progress in the problem of interacting many-body quantum systems. The advances have drawn insights from and revealed profound connections between a broad range of fronts, including quantum field theory, black holes, quantum chaos, AMO, condensed matter physics and quantum information. A salient example of such interconnectedness is the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev (SYK), which is a model for strange metals, describes quantum gravity near black holes and constitutes a new class of large N QFT, sitting midway in complexity between vector and matrix models. This workshop will be devoted to the most exciting new developments in this field. Topics to be covered include:

• New exactly solvable quantum field theories
• Black holes
• Non-equilibrium systems
• Transport and quantum chaos
• Connections to condensed matter physics

9:30 AM Coffee and bagels

10:00 AM Regenesis, Quantum Chaos, and Hydrodynamics
Hong Liu, MIT

11:30 AM Coffee

12:00 PM Black Holes, Random Matrices, Baby Universes, and D-brane
Steve Shenker, Stanford

1:30 PM Lunch

2:30 PM Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking in Coupled SYK or Tensor Models
Igor Klebanov, Princeton

4:00 PM Coffee

4:30 PM Strange Metal Transport and Chaos from SYK Models
Subir Sachdev, Harvard

Register here.
Download event PDF here.


Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences & the CUNY doctoral program in Physics. Organized by Sebastian Franco (CCNY and The Graduate Center, CUNY), Vijay Balasubramanian (Princeton, U Penn, and The Graduate Center, CUNY), and Daniel Kabat (Lehman College and The Graduate Center CUNY)

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May
6
2:00 PM14:00

The information bottleneck theory of deep learning, and the computational benefits of hidden layers

  • The Science Center at the The Graduate Center, CUNY (Rm 4102) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Naftali Tishby, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

 Abstract:
In the past several years we have developed a comprehensive theory of large scale learning with Deep Neural Networks (DNN), when optimized with Stochastic Gradient Decent (SGD). The theory is built on three theoretical components: (1) rethinking the standard (PAC like) distribution independent worse case generalisation bounds - turning them to problem dependent typical (in the Information Theory sense) bounds that are independent of the model architecture. 

(2) The Information Plane theorem: For large scale typical learning the sample-complexity and accuracy tradeoff is characterized by only two numbers: the mutual information that the representation (a layer in the network) maintain on the input patterns, and the mutual information each layer has on the desired output label. The Information Theoretic optimal tradeoff between thees encoder and decoder information values is given by the Information Bottleneck (IB) bound for the rule specific input-output distribution.  (3) The layers of the DNN reach this optimal bound via standard SGD training, in high (input & layers) dimension.

In this talk I will briefly review these results and discuss two new surprising outcomes of this theory: (1) The computational benefit of the hidden layers, (2) the emerging understanding of the features encoded by each layers which follows from the convergence to the IB bound.

Based on joint works with Noga Zaslavsky, Ravid Ziv, and Amichai Painsky.

Naftali Tishby is the Ruth & Stan Flinkman Professor in Brain Research at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where he is a member of The Benin School of Computer Science and Engineering and The Edmond and Lilly Safra Center for Brain Sciences. Educated as physicist, he has made profound contributions to problems ranging from chemical reaction dynamics to speech recognition, and from natural language processing to the dynamics of real neural networks in the brain. In the late 1980s Tishby and colleagues recast learning in neural networks as a statistical physics problem, and went on to discover that learning in large networks could show phase transitions, as exposure to increasing numbers of examples “cools” the parameters of the network into a range of values that provides qualitatively better performance. Most recently he has emerged as one of the leading figures in efforts to understand the success of deep learning, and this will be the topic of his seminar.

We have set aside two hours, in the hopes of encouraging greater interaction and discussion.
Download the event flier here.

Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Physics and Biology.

Supported in part by the Center for the Physics of Biological Function, a joint effort of The Graduate Center and Princeton University

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Dynamics & information in transcriptional control
May
3
9:30 AM09:30

Dynamics & information in transcriptional control

  • The Graduate Center, CUNY (The Sklyight Room, Rm 9100) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS


All cells must control the way in which they read out the information encoded in their genes, and this control must make sense in relation to their environment. Much of this control happens at the step where DNA is transcribed into messenger RNA. In this symposium we explore recent progress in transcriptional control: new experiments that give us an unprecedented view of molecular events during transcription, new theoretical ideas about the way in which large numbers of molecules can cooperate to achieve more effective control, and new results on the idea that real biological control networks maybe be selected to reach the physical limits on their performance as information processing devices.

9:30 AM Coffee and bagels

10:00 AM Transcription factors, chromosome topology, and transcription control
Jie Xiao, Johns Hopkins University

11:30 AM Coffee

12:00 PM Phase separation and regulation of gene transcription in eukaryotes
Arup Chakraborty, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

1:30 PM Lunch

2:30 PM DNA polymer physics and transcription dynamics in the developing fly embryo
Thomas Gregor, Princeton University and Institut Pasteur

4:00 PM Coffee

4:30 PM Deriving the Drosophila gap gene network from optimization principles
Thomas Sokolowski, IST Austria

All are welcome, but please follow the links to register.

Download Event PDF here.
Download Full Series PDF here.
Register here.


Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Physics and Biology. Supported in part by the Center for the Physics of Biological Function, a joint effort of The Graduate Center and Princeton University. For more information see https://biophysics.princeton.edu.

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The problem of ecological diversity
Apr
12
9:30 AM09:30

The problem of ecological diversity

  • The Graduate Center, CUNY (The Science Center, Rm 4102) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

A dramatic fact about life on earth is its diversity of form and function. This has become even more clear as modern sequencing tools allow us to survey large populations of microbes, in environments ranging from the human gut to the open ocean. Classical ecological models, however, predict rather limited levels of species diversity. In this symposium we will explore recent experimental developments, as well as new theoretical approaches, grounded in statistical physics. We will see glimpses of the solution to the qualitative problem of diversity, but also outlines of theories that can make more quantitative connections to experiment.

10:00 AM Coffee and bagels

10:30 AM A bottom-up approach to microbial community assembly
Jeff Gore, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

12:00 PM Lunch

1:30 PM The origin of chaos in large interacting ecosystems
Giulio Biroli, École Normale Supérieure

3:00 PM Coffee

3:30 PM Microbial diversity and spatio-temporal chaos
Daniel Fisher, Stanford University

Discussions will continue informally in Room 5301, into the evening. A light buffet dinner will be served.

Download Event PDF here.
Download Full Series PDF here.
Register here.

Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Physics and Biology. Supported in part by the Center for the Physics of Biological Function, a joint effort of The Graduate Center and Princeton University. For more information please visit https://itsatcuny.org  and https://biophysics.princeton.edu.

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Apr
11
4:15 PM16:15

Filling metric spaces

  • Room 6496 at The Graduate Center CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Nonlinear Analysis and PDEs
Goals of these seminars are to discuss techniques that are used nonlinear problems arising in applied mathematics, physics or differential geometry.

Alexander Nabutovsky, University of Toronto 
Filling metric spaces 
Abstract: Uryson k-width of a metric space X measures how close X is to being k-dimensional. Several years ago Larry Guth proved that if M is a closed n-dimensional manifold, and the volume of each ball of radius 1 in M does not exceed a certain small constant e(n), then the Uryson (n-1)-width of M is less than 1. This result is a significant generalization of the famous Gromov's inequality relating the volume and the filling radius that plays a central role in systolic geometry. Guth asked if a much stronger and more general result holds true: Is there a constant e(m)>o such that each compact metric space with m-dimensional Hausdorff content less than e(m) always has (m-1)-dimensional Uryson width less than 1? Note that here the dimension of the metric space is not assumed to be m, and is allowed to be arbitrary. Such a result immediately leads to interesting new inequalities even for closed Riemannian manifolds. In my talk I am are going to discuss a joint project with Yevgeny Liokumovich, Boris Lishak and Regina Rotman towards the positive resolution of Guth's problem. 

These events are sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences. For more information go to https://www.math.csi.cuny.edu/~mlucia/GCactivities.html.

Those participating in the Nonlinear Analysis and PDE seminar may also be interested in the Geometric Analysis Seminar which meets Tuesdays in the same room 6496 starting at 3pm.

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Apr
5
11:00 AM11:00

Marcos Rigol: Emergent eigenstate solution to quantum dynamics far from equilibrium

  • Room 5209, The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

F Apr 5 11am Room 5209

Marcos Rigol, Pennsylvania State University

Quantum dynamics of interacting many-body systems has become a 
unique venue for the realization of novel states of matter. In this talk, we 
discuss how it can lead to the generation of time-evolving states that are 
eigenstates of emergent local Hamiltonians, not trivially related to the ones 
dictating the time evolution. We study geometric quenches in fermionic and 
bosonic systems in one-dimensional lattices, and provide examples of 
experimentally relevant time-evolving states [1,2] that are either ground 
states or highly excited eigenstates of emergent local Hamiltonians [3]. We 
also discuss the expansion of Mott insulating domains at finite temperature. 
Surprisingly, the melting of the Mott domain is accompanied by an effective 
cooling of the system [4]. We explain this phenomenon analytically using the 
equilibrium description provided by the emergent local Hamiltonian [4,5].

Part of the Condensed matter physics seminar series
Organizers: Sarang Gopalakrishnan & Tankut Can

Click here for full series printable PDF.

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Balance and Conflict
Apr
5
9:00 AM09:00

Balance and Conflict

  • The Graduate Center, CUNY (C201/202 - lower level) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Network dynamics in society, culture, and politics: Balance and Conflict

Network properties exist at many different levels: molecular reactions in biological systems, the creation of new ideas through social interactions, the diffusion of information through social media, and the factors that interact to create peace or violence.  This session will explore both the similarities and differences in the structure and function of those networks at different levels: from molecules through social media, to peace. This is the final event in a series of three symposia this semester.

Friday 5 April 2019

9:30 AM Coffee & Bagels

10:00 AM Network-based Dynamic Modeling of Biological Systems: Toward Understanding and Control 
Reka Albert, Pennsylvania State University

11:30 AM Where do new ideas come from, and what do we do when we get them?
Simon DeDeo, Carnegie Mellon University 

1:00 PM Lunch

2:00 PM Tribal Networks and Diffusion of News on Social Media
Soroush Vosoughi, MIT

3:30 PM Coffee

4:00 PM Factors in Sustainable Peace: Dynamical Models and Data Science
Larry Liebovitch, Queens College and The Graduate Center, CUNY

Register here.
Download the event PDF here.

Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Physics and Biology. For more information please visit https://itsatcuny.org

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Networks: From biology to society
Apr
4
6:30 PM18:30

Networks: From biology to society

  • The Skylight Room (Rm 9100) The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Lev Guzman-Vargas, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico

Larry Liebovitch, Queens College and The Graduate Center

Dana Weinberg, Queens College and The Graduate Center

Networks have been used to describe interactions at different levels of organization: between molecules in biological systems, between people in social systems, and even between parts of the brain that form an individual’s personality. Do the same rules apply at these different levels of organization? What can we learn from one level that helps us better understand other levels of organization? Professor Liebovitch will lead a panel discussion of these exciting questions with colleagues from different disciplines.

This is part of the City of Science series. See the CUNY Graduate Center Office of Public Programs for more information: https://www.gc.cuny.edu/All-GC-Events/GC-Presents. Register here.

This event is also part of the Network dynamics in society, culture, and politics series at the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences. Download the full series PDF here.

Additional co-sponsorship provided by the CUNY doctoral programs in Physics and Biology. 

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Apr
3
to Apr 4

Workshop on Nonlinear Problems in Geometry

  • The Science Center at The Graduate Center, CUNY (Rm. 4102) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Nonlinear problems naturally arise from studies in geometric problems. In the past several decades, researchers have developed many techniques in analyzing these problems, as well as vast applications in theoretical physics, astronomy and other sciences. This workshop will present some of the most recent developments.

Wednesday April 3rd
9:00am-9:30am: Breakfast
9:30am-10:30am: Yan Yan Li
􏰀10:30am-10:45am: Coffee
􏰀10:45am-11:45am: Gabriella Tarantello􏰀
11:45pm-1:30pm: Lunch break
􏰀1:30pm-2:30pm: Emmanuel Humbert􏰀
2:30pm-3pm: More Coffee
3pm-4pm: Ernst Kuwert

Thursday April 4th
9:00am-9:30am: Breakfast
9:30am-10:30am: Pengfei Guan
10:30am-10:45am: Coffee
10:45 am - 11:45 am: Lan-Hsuan Huang
11:45pm-1:30pm: Lunch break
1:30pm-2:30pm: Matt Gursky
2:30pm-3pm: More Coffee
3pm-4pm: Fengbo Hang

Download event pdf here.

Organized by 􏰀 Mohameden Ahmedou, Giessen(Germany). ZenoHuang, CUNY-GC/CSI, and Marcello Lucia,CUNY-GC/CSI. Sponsored by the the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences. For more info see https://www.math.csi.cuny.edu/~mlucia/GCactivities.html

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Mar
28
to Mar 29

Frontiers of Theoretical Physics II

  • The Science Center at The Graduate Center, CUNY (Rm 4102) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

An  extraordinary  feature  of  modern  theoretical  physics  is  its  interconnectedness.  As  we look  more  deeply  at  particular  problems,  we  find  unexpected  links  to  seemingly  very different  problems.  Ideas  and  methods  from  one  subfield  become  crucial  to  progress  ion other  subfields,  and  looking  at  new  phenomena  poses  conceptual  challenges  far beyond  the  original  context.  In  this  series  of  symposia  we  celebrate  this  unity  of  our subject,  bringing  together  leading  young  researchers  exploring  a  wide  range  of  topics. In  the  first  day’s  events,  we  will  hear  about  problems  ranging  from  the  physics  of biological  systems  to  quantum  gravity,  and  from  quantum  field  theory  to  the  interface between  physics  and  computation.

Thursday 28 March 2019

1:00 PM  Fundamental  Constraints  for  Fundamental  Theories
Rachel  Rosen,  Columbia  University

2:00 PM  Coffee

2:30 PM  Entropy  and  superspace
Amos  Yarom, Technion

Friday 29 March 2019

9:30 AM Coffee and bagels

10:00 AM  Many  facets  of  conformal  field  theories
Anatoly  Dymarsky,  University  of  Kentucky

11:00 AM  Coffee

11:30 AM  The  Surprising  Simplicity  of  Scattering  Amplitudes
Jacob  Bourjaily,  Niels  Bohr  Institute

12:30 PM Lunch

1:30 PM  Why  does AI  seem  hard  and  Physics  seem  simple?
Dan  Roberts,  Facebook  AI  Research

2:30 PM Coffee

3:00 PM  Shining  light  on  quantum  geometry  and  fractionalisation
Inti  Sodemann,  Max  Planck  Institute  for  the  Physics  of  Complex  Systems

Download event pdf here.

For more information please contact its@gc.cuny.edu or visit https://itsatcuny.org

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Mar
19
8:30 AM08:30

Frontiers of Theoretical Physics I

  • The Science Center at The Graduate Center, CUNY (Rm. 4102) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

An extraordinary feature of modern theoretical physics is its interconnectedness. As we look more deeply at particular problems, we find unexpected links to seemingly very different problems. Ideas and methods from one subfield become crucial to progress ion other subfields, and looking at new phenomena poses conceptual challenges far beyond the original context. In this series of symposia we celebrate this unity of our subject, bringing together leading young researchers exploring a wide range of topics. In the first day’s events, we will hear about problems ranging from the physics of biological systems to quantum gravity, and from quantum field theory to the interface between physics and computation.

8:30 AM Coffee and bagels

9:00 AM Statistical Physics of Microbiomes
Pankaj Mehta, Boston University

10:30 AM Coffee

11:00 PM A Conformal Window Into Quantum Gravity
Eric Perlmutter, Caltech

12:30 PM Lunch

1:30 PM New Large N Quantum Field Theories
Vladimir Rosenhaus, Institute for Advanced Study

3:00 PM Coffee

3:30 PM Accelerating Quantum Computing
Dries Sels, Boston University

Download event PDF here.

For more information please contact its@gc.cuny.edu
or visit https://itsatcuny.org

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Computational Modeling for High Energy Density Science and Complex Systems
Mar
15
2:00 PM14:00

Computational Modeling for High Energy Density Science and Complex Systems

High Energy Density Science is the study of matter under extreme pressures and temperatures that is too dense to be described by usual plasma physics but is too hot to be described by usual condensed matter physics. This is realized in a range of situations, from the cores of planets, to inertial confinement fusion capsules, to ultra-fast laser pulses impinging on a solid. Efficient and accurate quantum treatments of correlated electron dynamics as well as ion dynamics of large systems are required. Experts will discuss recent developments and challenges in the computational simulation of such complex systems.

2-3pm Electronic transport properties of warm dense matter from time-dependent density functional theory
Attila Cangi, Sandia National Labs

3:15-4:15pm Time-dependent density functional theory of molecules in liquids and at surfaces: many-body effects, broadening and enhancements
Michele Pavanello, Rutgers University at Newark

4:30-5:30pm The interplay of temperature and interaction strength in density functional theory
Aurora Pribram-Jones, University of California, Merced

Sponsore by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Chemistry and Physics. Please email nmaitra@hunter.cuny.edu with any questions.

Register here.
Download pdf event flier here.

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Collective phenomena: Neurons, networks, and language
Mar
15
9:30 AM09:30

Collective phenomena: Neurons, networks, and language

  • The Graduate Center, CUNY (The Skylight Room, Rm. 9100) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Life is more than the sum of its parts. In the brain, our thoughts and actions surely require coordination among large numbers of neurons. Such emergent, collective phenomena are the subject of a deep theoretical literature, much of it grounded in statistical physics, but the subject has been re-invigorated by the possibility of recording, simultaneously, the activity of hundreds or even thousands of individual neurons. In this symposium, we begin with an overview of these experimental developments, then explore different approaches to the theory of large neuronal networks, and finally ask if we can find a statistical physics description of what might be the brain’s most remarkable behavior—human language.

9:30 AM Coffee and bagels

10:00 AM Measuring and understanding the brain’s model of the external world
Loren Frank, University of California at San Francisco and HHMI

11:30 AM Coffee

12:00 PM The intrinsic neuronal dynamics of a canonical cognitive circuit
Ila Fiete, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

1:30 PM Lunch

2:30 PM Between chaos and functionality in the dynamics of large networks
Fred Wolf, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization

4:00 PM Coffee

4:30 PM The landscape of language: Insights from statistical mechanics
Eric DeGiuli, École Normale Supérieure

Register here.
Download event PDF here.
Download Full Series PDF here.

Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Physics and Biology. Supported in part by the Center for the Physics of Biological Function, a joint effort of The Graduate Center and Princeton University. For more information see https://biophysics.princeton.edu.

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Snapshots of quantum dynamics:  constraints, integrability and hidden orders
Mar
11
to Mar 13

Snapshots of quantum dynamics: constraints, integrability and hidden orders

  • The Science Center of The CUNY Graduate Center (Rm 4102) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This workshop is part of a continuing series of informal annual meetings on nonequilibrium quantum dynamics. Topics to be covered fall in four broad categories: (1) new concepts such as many-body quantum scars, fractons, and more generally the role constraints play in unconventional many-body quantum dynamics; (2) recent developments in integrable systems, particularly the understanding of diffusion and the dynamics of quantum information; (3) unifying the emerging understanding of dynamics in isolated quantum systems with what is known about the dynamics of dissipative systems; and (4) experimental developments in quantum gas microscopes and related settings that allow one to take single snapshots of many-body systems, and therefore enable one to probe new classes of theoretical objects, such as non-local order parameters and multipoint correlators.

Organizers:
Anushya Chandran (Boston University)
Sarang Gopalakrishnan (CUNY)
Robert Konik (Brookhaven National Lab)
Chris Laumann (Boston University)
Vadim Oganesyan (CUNY)
Anatoli Polkovnikov (Boston University)

Invited speakers:
Vincenzo Alba (University of Amsterdam)
M. Joe Bhaseen (Kings College London)
Fiona Burnell (University of Minnesota)
Claudio Castelnovo (University of Cambridge)
Sebastian Diehl (University of Cologne)
Anatoly Dymarsky (University of Kentucky)
Andrew Green (University College London)
David Huse (Princeton University)
Itamar Kimchi (JILA)
Michael Knap (Technical University of Munich)
Alicia Kollar (Princeton University)
Michael Kolodrubetz (University of Texas at Dallas)
Zala Lenarcic (University of California at Berkeley)
Aditi Mitra (New York University)
Rahul Nandkishore (University of Colorado at Boulder)
Jed Pixley (Rutgers University)
Leo Radzihovsky (University of Colorado at Boulder)
Marcos Rigol (Pennsylvania State University)
Antonello Scardicchio (ICTP Trieste)
Dominik Schneble (Stony Brook University)
Brian Skinner (MIT)
Shivaji Sondhi (Princeton University)
Romain Vasseur (UMass Amherst)
Emil Yuzbashyan (Rutgers University)

Register here.
Download pdf event flier here.
Download full schedule pdf here.

Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences and by the CUNY doctoral program in Physics, and by the Institute for Complex Adaptive Matter, Boston University, and Brookhaven National Laboratory For more information please visit https://itsatcuny.org

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Engagement  & Estrangement
Mar
1
9:00 AM09:00

Engagement & Estrangement

  • The Science Center at The Graduate Center, CUNY (Rm 4102) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Network dynamics in society, culture, and politics: Engagement and Estrangement

This symposium, the second in a series of three this semester, focuses on the evolution of collective intelligence and cooperation in human society. We will examine how behavior spreads in social networks, how network stability can be maintained, and about how cooperation may evolve.
Friday 1 March 2019

9:30am: Coffee & Bagels

10am: How behavior spreads
Damon Centola, University of Pennsylvania

11:30am: Network influencers: Understanding information flow and stability in networks
Hernan Makse, CCNY and The Graduate Center, CUNY

1pm: Lunch

2pm: The evolution of cooperation in social systems
David Melamed, Ohio State University

3:30pm: Coffee

4pm: Crowd wisdom enhanced by costly signaling in a virtual rating system
Ofer Tchernichovski, Hunter College and The Graduate Center, CUNY

Register here.
Download the event PDF here.

Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Physics and Biology. For more information please visit https://itsatcuny.org

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Swarm intelligence: From insects to humans
Feb
28
6:30 PM18:30

Swarm intelligence: From insects to humans

  • The Skylight Room (Rm 9100) The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Guy Theraulaz, University of Toulouse and CNRS

Sometimes the whole really is more than the sum of its parts. As humans, we organize ourselves into groups that accomplish more than any of us could alone, and so do many other animals. Professor Theraulaz will give us a guided tour of his influential work on these remarkable phenomena, from the construction of nests by ants and wasps, to the schooling of fish and the behavior of human crowds.

This is part of the City of Science series. For more information please visit the CUNY Graduate Center Office of Public Programs: https://www.gc.cuny.edu/All-GC-Events/GC-Presents. Register here.

This event is also part of the Network dynamics in society, culture, and politics series at the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences. Download the full series PDF here.

Additional co-sponsorship provided by the CUNY doctoral programs in Physics and Biology. 

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Feb
15
11:00 AM11:00

Complexity of Linear Regions in Deep Networks

  • Room 5209, The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

F Feb 15 11am Room 5209

Boris Hanin, Texas A&M University
Organizers: Sarang Gopalakrishnan & Tankut Can

More info:
Boris Hanin is a mathematician work on deep learning and mathematical physics. Before joining the faculty in the Math Department at Texas A&M in 2017, he was an NSF Postdoc in Math at MIT. He is currently a Visiting Scientist at Facebook AI Research in NYC.

“I will present several new results, joint with David Rolnick, about the number of linear regions and the sizes of the boundaries of linear regions in a network N with piecewise linear activations and random weights/biases.

I will discuss a new formula for the average complexity of linear regions that holds even for highly correlated weights and biases, and hence is valid throughout training. It shows, for example, that at initialization, the number of regions along any 1D line grows like the number of neurons in N. In particular, perhaps surprisingly, it is this number is not exponential in the depth of the network. 

I will explain the analog of this result for higher input dimension and will report on a number of experiments, which demonstrate empirically that our precise theorems at initialization can be expected to hold qualitatively throughout training.”

Click here for full series printable PDF.

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Network dynamics in society, culture, and politics: Crowds and cooperation
Feb
1
9:30 AM09:30

Network dynamics in society, culture, and politics: Crowds and cooperation

  • The Science Center (Rm 4120) at the CUNY Graduate Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This symposium, the first in a series of three this semester, explores the convergence among data sciences, network dynamics, and social sciences in studying the evolution of cooperation and segregation. We discuss both basic science and practical challenges, including real-world empirical studies, across a wide range of examples.

9:30 AM Coffee and bagels

10:00 AM Data science at The New York Times
Chris Wiggins, Columbia University and The New York Times

11:30 AM Coffee

12:00 PM Fashion dynamics: Cycles, shocks, and politics
Stefano Ghirlanda, Brooklyn College & The Graduate Center; Stockholm University

1:30 PM Lunch

2:30 PM Agency and structure in the genesis of network segregation
Kevin Lewis, University of California at San Diego

4:00 PM Coffee

4:30 PM Cooperation in complex societies: How do inter-ethnic relationships affect pro-social behavior?
Delia Baldassarri, New York University

Register here.
Download the event PDF here.

Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Physics and Biology. 

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