ITS @ CUNY

Calendar

Condensed Matter Physics Seminar Series: Jie Wang
Oct
18
11:00 AM11:00

Condensed Matter Physics Seminar Series: Jie Wang

  • Room 5209 at The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Friday, October 18th at 11 am
Room 5209 at The Graduate Center, CUNY

Jie Wang, Flatiron Institute
https://www.simonsfoundation.org/team/jie-wang/

"Emergent Dirac fermions in Composite Fermi Liquids".

Abstract: Interacting electrons in high magnetic fields exhibit rich physical phenomena including the gapped fractional quantum Hall effects and the gapless states. The composite Fermi liquids (CFLs) are gapless states that can occur at even denominator Landau level fillings. Due to the celebrated work of Halperin, Lee and Read (94), the CFLs were understood as Fermi liquids of composite fermions, which are bound states of electrons and electromagnetic flux quanta. However, at 1/2 filling, it is not obvious why the HLR description is consistent with the particle hole symmetry. Motivated by this, recently Son (15) proposed an alternative description for CFLs at 1/2, according to which the composite fermions are instead emergent Dirac fermions. Importantly, Son’s theory predicts a Pi Berry curvature singularity at the composite Fermi sea center. In this talk, I will focus on the Berry phase aspect of CFLs, and talk about the emergent Dirac fermions at low energy at one-half and other generic filling fractions.

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Recent Advances in Electron and Proton Transfer Theories
Oct
25
9:30 AM09:30

Recent Advances in Electron and Proton Transfer Theories

  • The Science Center (Rm. 4102) at The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Friday, October 25, 2019

9:30am-6:30pm
The Skylight Room (Rm. 9100) at The Graduate Center, CUNY

Electron and/or proton transfer processes are ubiquitous, and play key roles in catalysis, energy conversion, biological respiration and signaling, to name a few. Clear mechanistic understanding and quantitative description of these processes require development of new concepts at fundamental level as well as accurate methods of quantum calculation in complex environments. This workshop brings experts offering cutting edge advances in these areas and new ideas for the next level of development.

9:00 AM    Coffee and bagels

9:30 AM    Proton-coupled electron transfer in catalysis & energy conversion
Sharon Hammes-Schiffer, Yale University

11:00 AM  Quantum dynamical simulations of proton-coupled electron transfer reactions
Pengfei (Frank) Huo, University of Rochester

12:10 PM Lunch

1:30 PM   Electron transfer in respiratory complex 1
Alexei Stuchebrukhov, UC Davis

3:00 PM   Protein electron transfer: Noergodic sampling, FDT violation, and solvent dynamical effect
Dmitry Matyushov, Arizona State University

4:30 PM   Electron transfer signaling and multi-electron brokering in biology
David Beratan, Duke University

Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Chemistry and Physics. Please email sjang@qc.cuny.edu with any questions. For more information please visit https://itsatcuny.org.

Download Printable PDF Schedule here.
Register here.
Download Full Series PDF here.

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Recent Advances in Nonlinear Problems
Oct
31
9:30 AM09:30

Recent Advances in Nonlinear Problems

  • The Science Center (Rm. 4102) at The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Thursday, October 31, 2019

9:30am-4:00pm
The Science Center (Rm. 4102) at The Graduate Center, CUNY

Nonlinear PDE is an important mathematical area that impacts many different fields in mathematics and physics. This one-day event, which is now part of a symposium series at the Graduate Center, CUNY, aims to explore recent trends, applications, and future directions in this very active area.

9:00 AM Coffee

9:30 AM Immersed 2-spheres in ℝ3 from a Morse theoretic perspective
Tristan Rivière, ETH Zürich (Switzerland)

10:30 AM Coffee

10:45 AM Boundary operator associated to 𝜎𝑘 curvature
Yi Wang, Johns Hopkins University (USA)

11:45 AM Lunch

1:30 PM Topological & variational methods for the supercritical Moser-Trudinger equation
Luca Martinazzi, University of Padua (Italy)

2:30 PM Coffee

3:00 PM Symmetries and concentration in variational problems
Mónica Clapp, Universidad Nacional Autónoma (México)

Register here.
Download printable event pdf here.
Download event packet with full speaker abstracts here.
Download Full Series PDF here.

Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY Graduate Center departments of Math and Physics, as well as College of Staten Island. Organized by Marcello Lucia (marcello.lucia@csi.cuny.edu) and Zeno Huang (zheng.huang@csi.cuny.edu).
For more information, visit https://itsatcuny.org or http://www.math.csi.cuny.edu/ciamcs.

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Searching for simpler models
Nov
15
9:30 AM09:30

Searching for simpler models

  • The Skylight Room (Rm. 9100) at The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Friday, November 15, 2019

9:30am-6:00pm
The Skylight Room (Rm. 9100) at The Graduate Center, CUNY

There has been remarkable progress in turning our qualitative preference for simple models of the natural world into quantitative, mathematical principles. We explore these developments, both as general principles and in examples from biological systems and deep neural networks.

Speakers & Full Day Schedule TBD.
Register here.
Download full series pdf here.

Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Physics and Biology. Supported in part by the Center for the Physics of Biological Function, a joint effort of The Graduate Center and Princeton University. For more information please visit https://itsatcuny.org and https://biophysics.princeton.edu.

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Conformal Bootstrap and Related Ideas
Nov
22
9:30 AM09:30

Conformal Bootstrap and Related Ideas

  • Elebash Recital Hall at The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Friday, November 22, 2019

9:30am-6:00pm
Elebash Recital Hall at The Graduate Center, CUNY

The bootstrap program aims to map the space of possible quantum field theories, constrained only by symmetries and the basic principles of quantum mechanics. We explore exciting new developments, including non-perturbative results, field theories at finite temperature, and more.

Speakers Include:

Jared Kaplan, Johns Hopkins University
David Poland, Yale University
Silvu S. Pufu, Princeton University
Leonardo Rastelli, Stony Brook University

Full Day Schedule TBD.
Register here.
Download Full Series PDF here.
Organized by Sebastian Franco, sfranco@ccny.cuny.edu.

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Adaptation
Dec
6
9:30 AM09:30

Adaptation

  • The Martin E. Segal Theatre (1st Floor) at The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Friday, December 6, 2019

9:30am-6:00pm
The Martin E. Segal Theatre (1st Floor) at The Graduate Center, CUNY

Living systems achieve their extraordinary functions in part by adapting their strategies to the structure of their environment. We explore examples of this phenomenon in systems from bacteria to brains, searching for a unifying theoretical framework.

  9:30 AM Coffee and bagels

10:00 AM Adaptation and Bayesian forecasting in biological systems
Thierry Mora, École Normale Supérieure and Princeton University

11:30 AM Coffee

12:00 PM Neural adaptation: Theory, models, and mechanism
Adrienne Fairhall, University of Washington

1:30 PM Lunch

2:30 PM Adaptation and behavioral feedback in chemical sensing and navigation
Thierry Emonet, Yale University

4:00 PM Coffee

4:30 PM Adaptation and control in molecular evolution
Armita Nourmohammad, University of Washington

Register here.
Download printable event pdf here.
Download full series pdf here.

Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Physics and Biology. Supported in part by the Center for the Physics of Biological Function, a joint effort of The Graduate Center and Princeton University. For more information please visit https://itsatcuny.org and https://biophysics.princeton.edu.

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Fluid phases of matter: From electron liquids to active matter
Dec
11
to Dec 13

Fluid phases of matter: From electron liquids to active matter

  • The Science Center (Rm. 4102) at The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Weds, Dec 11 - Fri, Dec 13, 2019

9:30am-6:00pm Daily
The Graduate Center, CUNY

Topics will include the experimental discovery of hydrodynamic electron flow in graphene and other materials, the prediction and observation of odd elasticity and viscosity in active matter, and new transport coefficients from the Schwinger-Keldysh framework.

Speakers & Full Three Day Schedule TBD.
Register here.
Download full series pdf here.

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Towards the physics of more complex behaviors
Oct
11
9:30 AM09:30

Towards the physics of more complex behaviors

  • The Science Center (Rm. 4102) at The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Friday, October 11, 2019

9:30am-6:00pm
The Science Center (Rm. 4102) at The Graduate Center, CUNY

In the past decade there has been considerable progress toward a “physics of behavior,” taming the complexity of animal movements in their natural contexts. Here we explore the next layers of complexity in songbirds, dolphins, and the general problem of animal navigation.

9:30 AM Bagels & Coffee

10:00 AM Animal Navigation in Uncertain Environments
Agnese Seminara, Institut de Physique de Nice

11:30 AM Coffee Break

12:00 PM Quantitative windows into the minds of dolphins
Marcelo Magnasco, Rockefeller University

1:30 PM Lunch

2:30 PM How birds sing: taking precise data, making precise theories, Part I
Ilya Nemenman & Samuel Sober, Emory University

4:00 PM Coffee Break

4:30 PM How birds sing, Part II
Ilya Nemenman & Samuel Sober, Emory University

Register here.
Download Event PDF here.
Download Full Series PDF here.

Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Physics and Biology. Supported in part by the Center for the Physics of Biological Function, a joint effort of The Graduate Center and Princeton University. For more information please visit https://itsatcuny.org and https://biophysics.princeton.edu.

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Student talks @ ITS
Sep
16
4:00 PM16:00

Student talks @ ITS

  • Room 5209 at The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

September 16, Monday, 4PM

 This collection of talks begins a series of events aimed at promoting interactions among CUNY graduate students, especially in theoretical physics. Everybody (including undergrads, postdocs AND faculty)  are welcome. Refreshments will be provided. Students interested in speaking at future events should reach out tovadim.oganesyan@csi.cuny.edu and/or come to this event.

Format – short (15 min talks) to introduce research topics and salient results. Detailed followup discussion to continue later if desired.

 

 Will Gyori
“Exploring thermal properties of dense QCD in a magnetic field using free energy expansion coefficients”

 

Aleix Bou Comas
“Manipulating Quantum Spins by Spin-Polarized Current: An Approach Based Upon PT-symmetric Quantum Mechanics”

 

 Vikram Ravindranath
Localisation and Transport in Aperiodically Kicked Tight-Binding Models”

Download Event pdf here.

Co-sponsored by the PhD in Physics and the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences.

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J Sethna: Sloppy models, differential geometry, and the space of model predictions
Sep
13
11:00 AM11:00

J Sethna: Sloppy models, differential geometry, and the space of model predictions

  • Room 5209 at The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

James P. Sethna, Katherine Quinn, Archishman Raju, Mark Transtrum, Ben Machta, Ricky Chachra, Ryan Gutenkunst, Joshua J. Waterfall, Fergal P. Casey, Kevin S. Brown, Christopher R. Myers
Cornell University

Models of systems biology, climate change, ecology, complex instruments, and macroeconomics have parameters that are hard or impossible to measure directly. If we fit these unknown parameters, fiddling with them until they agree with past experiments, how much can we trust their predictions? We have found that predictions can be made despite huge uncertainties in the parameters – many parameter combinations are mostly unimportant to the collective behavior. We will use ideas and methods from differential geometry and approximation theory to explain sloppiness as a ‘hyper-ribbon’ structure of the manifold of possible model predictions. We show that physics theories are also sloppy – that sloppiness may be the underlying reason why the world is comprehensible. We will present new methods for visualizing this model manifold for probabilistic systems – such as the space of possible universes as measured by the cosmic microwave background radiation.

Seminar with:

James Sethna, Cornell University
http://sethna.lassp.cornell.edu/

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May
16
4:15 PM16:15

Three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics system forced by space-time white noise 

  • Room 6496 at The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Kazuo Yamazaki, University of Rochester 

Abstract: The magnetohydrodynamics system consists of the Navier-Stokes equations forced by Lorentz force, coupled with the Maxwell's equations from electromagnetism. This talk will be relatively expository about the direction of research on stochastic PDE forced by space-time white noise, with a new result on the three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics system forced by space-time white noise. In short, the fact that the noise is white in not only time but also space forces the solution to become extremely rough in spatial variable, its regularity akin to those of distributions, so that it becomes difficult for the non-linear term to become well-defined in any classical sense because there is no universal agreement on a product of a distribution with another distribution. Our discussion should also include following systems of equations: Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation, Boussinesq system. The following notions and techniques may also be included in our discussions: Feynman diagrams, local subcriticality, paracontrolled distributions, renormalizations, regularity structures, rough path theory, Wick products, Young's integral. 

Part of the Non-Linear Study Group. For more info, see https://www.math.csi.cuny.edu/~mlucia/GCactivities.html

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Quantum Dynamics and Control beyond Simple Models and Approximations
May
10
9:00 AM09:00

Quantum Dynamics and Control beyond Simple Models and Approximations

  • The Science Center at The Graduate Center, CUNY (Room 4102) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

From fundamental conceptual issues to the development of novel quantum devices, accurate calculation and control of quantum dynamical systems have great implications. However, beyond simple models and approximations, such tasks in general involve notoriously difficult theoretical problems. This workshop brings together experts working on these topics from both fields of condensed matter physics and chemical physics. The workshop will offer multifaceted information on current advances of quantum dynamics and control, and also will help understand core theoretical issues.

9:00 - 9:30 AM Bagels and Coffee

9:30 - 10:40 AM From defect creation to order parameter steering: Dynamical phase transitions in condensed matter systems
Andrew Millis, Columbia University and the Flatiron Institute

11:00 - 12:10 PM The multilayer multi-configuration time dependent Hartree theory
Haobin Wang, University of Colorado Denver

12:10 - 1:30 PM Lunch

1:30 - 2:40 PM Accurate and efficient non-adiabatic quantum dynamics using master equations
Tom Markland, Stanford University

3:00 - 4:10 PM Manifestations of chaos in many-body quantum dynamics
Lea Santos, Yeshiva University

4:30 - 5:40 PM Controlling quantum dynamics phenomena with shaped fields acting as photonic reagents
Herschel A Rabitz, Princeton University

Register here.
Download printable PDF schedule here.


Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Chemistry and Physics. Organized by Dr. Seogjoo Jang. Please email sjang@qc.cuny.edu with any questions

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May
9
4:15 PM16:15

A spiral interface with positive Alt-Caffarelli-Friedman limit at the origin 

  • Room 6496 at The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Dennis Kriventsov, Rutgers University 

Abstract: I will discuss an example of a pair of continuous nonnegative subharmonic functions, each vanishing where the other is positive, which have a strictly positive limit for the Alt-Caffarelli-Friedman monotonicity formula at the origin, but for which the origin is not a point of differentiability for the boundary of their supports. Time permitting, I will also discuss some further progress on related problems.This is based on joint work with Mark Allen. 

Part of the Non-Linear Study Group. For more info, see https://www.math.csi.cuny.edu/~mlucia/GCactivities.html

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Many Body Quantum Dynamics: Perspectives From Field Theory and Gravity
May
9
9:00 AM09:00

Many Body Quantum Dynamics: Perspectives From Field Theory and Gravity

  • Elebash Hall (1st Floor), The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

In recent years, there has been significant progress in the problem of interacting many-body quantum systems. The advances have drawn insights from and revealed profound connections between a broad range of fronts, including quantum field theory, black holes, quantum chaos, AMO, condensed matter physics and quantum information. A salient example of such interconnectedness is the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev (SYK), which is a model for strange metals, describes quantum gravity near black holes and constitutes a new class of large N QFT, sitting midway in complexity between vector and matrix models. This workshop will be devoted to the most exciting new developments in this field. Topics to be covered include:

• New exactly solvable quantum field theories
• Black holes
• Non-equilibrium systems
• Transport and quantum chaos
• Connections to condensed matter physics

9:30 AM Coffee and bagels

10:00 AM Regenesis, Quantum Chaos, and Hydrodynamics
Hong Liu, MIT

11:30 AM Coffee

12:00 PM Black Holes, Random Matrices, Baby Universes, and D-brane
Steve Shenker, Stanford

1:30 PM Lunch

2:30 PM Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking in Coupled SYK or Tensor Models
Igor Klebanov, Princeton

4:00 PM Coffee

4:30 PM Strange Metal Transport and Chaos from SYK Models
Subir Sachdev, Harvard

Register here.
Download event PDF here.


Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences & the CUNY doctoral program in Physics. Organized by Sebastian Franco (CCNY and The Graduate Center, CUNY), Vijay Balasubramanian (Princeton, U Penn, and The Graduate Center, CUNY), and Daniel Kabat (Lehman College and The Graduate Center CUNY)

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May
6
2:00 PM14:00

The information bottleneck theory of deep learning, and the computational benefits of hidden layers

  • The Science Center at the The Graduate Center, CUNY (Rm 4102) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Naftali Tishby, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

 Abstract:
In the past several years we have developed a comprehensive theory of large scale learning with Deep Neural Networks (DNN), when optimized with Stochastic Gradient Decent (SGD). The theory is built on three theoretical components: (1) rethinking the standard (PAC like) distribution independent worse case generalisation bounds - turning them to problem dependent typical (in the Information Theory sense) bounds that are independent of the model architecture. 

(2) The Information Plane theorem: For large scale typical learning the sample-complexity and accuracy tradeoff is characterized by only two numbers: the mutual information that the representation (a layer in the network) maintain on the input patterns, and the mutual information each layer has on the desired output label. The Information Theoretic optimal tradeoff between thees encoder and decoder information values is given by the Information Bottleneck (IB) bound for the rule specific input-output distribution.  (3) The layers of the DNN reach this optimal bound via standard SGD training, in high (input & layers) dimension.

In this talk I will briefly review these results and discuss two new surprising outcomes of this theory: (1) The computational benefit of the hidden layers, (2) the emerging understanding of the features encoded by each layers which follows from the convergence to the IB bound.

Based on joint works with Noga Zaslavsky, Ravid Ziv, and Amichai Painsky.

Naftali Tishby is the Ruth & Stan Flinkman Professor in Brain Research at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where he is a member of The Benin School of Computer Science and Engineering and The Edmond and Lilly Safra Center for Brain Sciences. Educated as physicist, he has made profound contributions to problems ranging from chemical reaction dynamics to speech recognition, and from natural language processing to the dynamics of real neural networks in the brain. In the late 1980s Tishby and colleagues recast learning in neural networks as a statistical physics problem, and went on to discover that learning in large networks could show phase transitions, as exposure to increasing numbers of examples “cools” the parameters of the network into a range of values that provides qualitatively better performance. Most recently he has emerged as one of the leading figures in efforts to understand the success of deep learning, and this will be the topic of his seminar.

We have set aside two hours, in the hopes of encouraging greater interaction and discussion.
Download the event flier here.

Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Physics and Biology.

Supported in part by the Center for the Physics of Biological Function, a joint effort of The Graduate Center and Princeton University

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Dynamics & information in transcriptional control
May
3
9:30 AM09:30

Dynamics & information in transcriptional control

  • The Graduate Center, CUNY (The Sklyight Room, Rm 9100) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS


All cells must control the way in which they read out the information encoded in their genes, and this control must make sense in relation to their environment. Much of this control happens at the step where DNA is transcribed into messenger RNA. In this symposium we explore recent progress in transcriptional control: new experiments that give us an unprecedented view of molecular events during transcription, new theoretical ideas about the way in which large numbers of molecules can cooperate to achieve more effective control, and new results on the idea that real biological control networks maybe be selected to reach the physical limits on their performance as information processing devices.

9:30 AM Coffee and bagels

10:00 AM Transcription factors, chromosome topology, and transcription control
Jie Xiao, Johns Hopkins University

11:30 AM Coffee

12:00 PM Phase separation and regulation of gene transcription in eukaryotes
Arup Chakraborty, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

1:30 PM Lunch

2:30 PM DNA polymer physics and transcription dynamics in the developing fly embryo
Thomas Gregor, Princeton University and Institut Pasteur

4:00 PM Coffee

4:30 PM Deriving the Drosophila gap gene network from optimization principles
Thomas Sokolowski, IST Austria

All are welcome, but please follow the links to register.

Download Event PDF here.
Download Full Series PDF here.
Register here.


Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Physics and Biology. Supported in part by the Center for the Physics of Biological Function, a joint effort of The Graduate Center and Princeton University. For more information see https://biophysics.princeton.edu.

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The problem of ecological diversity
Apr
12
9:30 AM09:30

The problem of ecological diversity

  • The Graduate Center, CUNY (The Science Center, Rm 4102) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

A dramatic fact about life on earth is its diversity of form and function. This has become even more clear as modern sequencing tools allow us to survey large populations of microbes, in environments ranging from the human gut to the open ocean. Classical ecological models, however, predict rather limited levels of species diversity. In this symposium we will explore recent experimental developments, as well as new theoretical approaches, grounded in statistical physics. We will see glimpses of the solution to the qualitative problem of diversity, but also outlines of theories that can make more quantitative connections to experiment.

10:00 AM Coffee and bagels

10:30 AM A bottom-up approach to microbial community assembly
Jeff Gore, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

12:00 PM Lunch

1:30 PM The origin of chaos in large interacting ecosystems
Giulio Biroli, École Normale Supérieure

3:00 PM Coffee

3:30 PM Microbial diversity and spatio-temporal chaos
Daniel Fisher, Stanford University

Discussions will continue informally in Room 5301, into the evening. A light buffet dinner will be served.

Download Event PDF here.
Download Full Series PDF here.
Register here.

Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Physics and Biology. Supported in part by the Center for the Physics of Biological Function, a joint effort of The Graduate Center and Princeton University. For more information please visit https://itsatcuny.org  and https://biophysics.princeton.edu.

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Apr
11
4:15 PM16:15

Filling metric spaces

  • Room 6496 at The Graduate Center CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Nonlinear Analysis and PDEs
Goals of these seminars are to discuss techniques that are used nonlinear problems arising in applied mathematics, physics or differential geometry.

Alexander Nabutovsky, University of Toronto 
Filling metric spaces 
Abstract: Uryson k-width of a metric space X measures how close X is to being k-dimensional. Several years ago Larry Guth proved that if M is a closed n-dimensional manifold, and the volume of each ball of radius 1 in M does not exceed a certain small constant e(n), then the Uryson (n-1)-width of M is less than 1. This result is a significant generalization of the famous Gromov's inequality relating the volume and the filling radius that plays a central role in systolic geometry. Guth asked if a much stronger and more general result holds true: Is there a constant e(m)>o such that each compact metric space with m-dimensional Hausdorff content less than e(m) always has (m-1)-dimensional Uryson width less than 1? Note that here the dimension of the metric space is not assumed to be m, and is allowed to be arbitrary. Such a result immediately leads to interesting new inequalities even for closed Riemannian manifolds. In my talk I am are going to discuss a joint project with Yevgeny Liokumovich, Boris Lishak and Regina Rotman towards the positive resolution of Guth's problem. 

These events are sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences. For more information go to https://www.math.csi.cuny.edu/~mlucia/GCactivities.html.

Those participating in the Nonlinear Analysis and PDE seminar may also be interested in the Geometric Analysis Seminar which meets Tuesdays in the same room 6496 starting at 3pm.

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Apr
5
11:00 AM11:00

Marcos Rigol: Emergent eigenstate solution to quantum dynamics far from equilibrium

  • Room 5209, The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

F Apr 5 11am Room 5209

Marcos Rigol, Pennsylvania State University

Quantum dynamics of interacting many-body systems has become a 
unique venue for the realization of novel states of matter. In this talk, we 
discuss how it can lead to the generation of time-evolving states that are 
eigenstates of emergent local Hamiltonians, not trivially related to the ones 
dictating the time evolution. We study geometric quenches in fermionic and 
bosonic systems in one-dimensional lattices, and provide examples of 
experimentally relevant time-evolving states [1,2] that are either ground 
states or highly excited eigenstates of emergent local Hamiltonians [3]. We 
also discuss the expansion of Mott insulating domains at finite temperature. 
Surprisingly, the melting of the Mott domain is accompanied by an effective 
cooling of the system [4]. We explain this phenomenon analytically using the 
equilibrium description provided by the emergent local Hamiltonian [4,5].

Part of the Condensed matter physics seminar series
Organizers: Sarang Gopalakrishnan & Tankut Can

Click here for full series printable PDF.

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Balance and Conflict
Apr
5
9:00 AM09:00

Balance and Conflict

  • The Graduate Center, CUNY (C201/202 - lower level) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Network dynamics in society, culture, and politics: Balance and Conflict

Network properties exist at many different levels: molecular reactions in biological systems, the creation of new ideas through social interactions, the diffusion of information through social media, and the factors that interact to create peace or violence.  This session will explore both the similarities and differences in the structure and function of those networks at different levels: from molecules through social media, to peace. This is the final event in a series of three symposia this semester.

Friday 5 April 2019

9:30 AM Coffee & Bagels

10:00 AM Network-based Dynamic Modeling of Biological Systems: Toward Understanding and Control 
Reka Albert, Pennsylvania State University

11:30 AM Where do new ideas come from, and what do we do when we get them?
Simon DeDeo, Carnegie Mellon University 

1:00 PM Lunch

2:00 PM Tribal Networks and Diffusion of News on Social Media
Soroush Vosoughi, MIT

3:30 PM Coffee

4:00 PM Factors in Sustainable Peace: Dynamical Models and Data Science
Larry Liebovitch, Queens College and The Graduate Center, CUNY

Register here.
Download the event PDF here.

Sponsored by the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, and by the CUNY doctoral programs in Physics and Biology. For more information please visit https://itsatcuny.org

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Networks: From biology to society
Apr
4
6:30 PM18:30

Networks: From biology to society

  • The Skylight Room (Rm 9100) The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Lev Guzman-Vargas, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico

Larry Liebovitch, Queens College and The Graduate Center

Dana Weinberg, Queens College and The Graduate Center

Networks have been used to describe interactions at different levels of organization: between molecules in biological systems, between people in social systems, and even between parts of the brain that form an individual’s personality. Do the same rules apply at these different levels of organization? What can we learn from one level that helps us better understand other levels of organization? Professor Liebovitch will lead a panel discussion of these exciting questions with colleagues from different disciplines.

This is part of the City of Science series. See the CUNY Graduate Center Office of Public Programs for more information: https://www.gc.cuny.edu/All-GC-Events/GC-Presents. Register here.

This event is also part of the Network dynamics in society, culture, and politics series at the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences. Download the full series PDF here.

Additional co-sponsorship provided by the CUNY doctoral programs in Physics and Biology. 

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Apr
3
to Apr 4

Workshop on Nonlinear Problems in Geometry

  • The Science Center at The Graduate Center, CUNY (Rm. 4102) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Nonlinear problems naturally arise from studies in geometric problems. In the past several decades, researchers have developed many techniques in analyzing these problems, as well as vast applications in theoretical physics, astronomy and other sciences. This workshop will present some of the most recent developments.

Wednesday April 3rd
9:00am-9:30am: Breakfast
9:30am-10:30am: Yan Yan Li
􏰀10:30am-10:45am: Coffee
􏰀10:45am-11:45am: Gabriella Tarantello􏰀
11:45pm-1:30pm: Lunch break
􏰀1:30pm-2:30pm: Emmanuel Humbert􏰀
2:30pm-3pm: More Coffee
3pm-4pm: Ernst Kuwert

Thursday April 4th
9:00am-9:30am: Breakfast
9:30am-10:30am: Pengfei Guan
10:30am-10:45am: Coffee
10:45 am - 11:45 am: Lan-Hsuan Huang
11:45pm-1:30pm: Lunch break
1:30pm-2:30pm: Matt Gursky
2:30pm-3pm: More Coffee
3pm-4pm: Fengbo Hang

Download event pdf here.

Organized by 􏰀 Mohameden Ahmedou, Giessen(Germany). ZenoHuang, CUNY-GC/CSI, and Marcello Lucia,CUNY-GC/CSI. Sponsored by the the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences. For more info see https://www.math.csi.cuny.edu/~mlucia/GCactivities.html

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Mar
28
to Mar 29

Frontiers of Theoretical Physics II

  • The Science Center at The Graduate Center, CUNY (Rm 4102) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

An  extraordinary  feature  of  modern  theoretical  physics  is  its  interconnectedness.  As  we look  more  deeply  at  particular  problems,  we  find  unexpected  links  to  seemingly  very different  problems.  Ideas  and  methods  from  one  subfield  become  crucial  to  progress  ion other  subfields,  and  looking  at  new  phenomena  poses  conceptual  challenges  far beyond  the  original  context.  In  this  series  of  symposia  we  celebrate  this  unity  of  our subject,  bringing  together  leading  young  researchers  exploring  a  wide  range  of  topics. In  the  first  day’s  events,  we  will  hear  about  problems  ranging  from  the  physics  of biological  systems  to  quantum  gravity,  and  from  quantum  field  theory  to  the  interface between  physics  and  computation.

Thursday 28 March 2019

1:00 PM  Fundamental  Constraints  for  Fundamental  Theories
Rachel  Rosen,  Columbia  University

2:00 PM  Coffee

2:30 PM  Entropy  and  superspace
Amos  Yarom, Technion

Friday 29 March 2019

9:30 AM Coffee and bagels

10:00 AM  Many  facets  of  conformal  field  theories
Anatoly  Dymarsky,  University  of  Kentucky

11:00 AM  Coffee

11:30 AM  The  Surprising  Simplicity  of  Scattering  Amplitudes
Jacob  Bourjaily,  Niels  Bohr  Institute

12:30 PM Lunch

1:30 PM  Why  does AI  seem  hard  and  Physics  seem  simple?
Dan  Roberts,  Facebook  AI  Research

2:30 PM Coffee

3:00 PM  Shining  light  on  quantum  geometry  and  fractionalisation
Inti  Sodemann,  Max  Planck  Institute  for  the  Physics  of  Complex  Systems

Download event pdf here.

For more information please contact its@gc.cuny.edu or visit https://itsatcuny.org

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Mar
19
8:30 AM08:30

Frontiers of Theoretical Physics I

  • The Science Center at The Graduate Center, CUNY (Rm. 4102) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

An extraordinary feature of modern theoretical physics is its interconnectedness. As we look more deeply at particular problems, we find unexpected links to seemingly very different problems. Ideas and methods from one subfield become crucial to progress ion other subfields, and looking at new phenomena poses conceptual challenges far beyond the original context. In this series of symposia we celebrate this unity of our subject, bringing together leading young researchers exploring a wide range of topics. In the first day’s events, we will hear about problems ranging from the physics of biological systems to quantum gravity, and from quantum field theory to the interface between physics and computation.

8:30 AM Coffee and bagels

9:00 AM Statistical Physics of Microbiomes
Pankaj Mehta, Boston University

10:30 AM Coffee

11:00 PM A Conformal Window Into Quantum Gravity
Eric Perlmutter, Caltech

12:30 PM Lunch

1:30 PM New Large N Quantum Field Theories
Vladimir Rosenhaus, Institute for Advanced Study

3:00 PM Coffee

3:30 PM Accelerating Quantum Computing
Dries Sels, Boston University

Download event PDF here.

For more information please contact its@gc.cuny.edu
or visit https://itsatcuny.org

View Event →